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Uss Iowa

USS IOWA Prepares for Final Transit

USS IOWA Mast vertical(sm).jpg

USS IOWA Takes on Iowa Coins, Regains its Mast, Prepares for its Final Journey; The Battleship of Presidents will open as an interactive naval museum in Los Angeles.   The time-honored tradition of adding coins to the mast of a ship for good luck took place as two Iowans stood atop a 205-foot-tall platform and dropped Iowa state quarters into the mast of the USS IOWA as it hung from a barge crane. Former Iowa legislator Jeff Lamberti of Ankeny and Becky Beach of Des Moines released a handful of coins into the mast shortly before eight welders reattached it to the historic battleship. Lamberti and Beach have played key roles in the effort to save the USS IOWA and transform the historic ship into an interactive naval museum.   The mast, which is 50 feet tall and weighs 52,000 pounds, had to be reattached because the Navy had removed it more than 10 years ago so the ship would fit under bridges along its tow route. The Pacific Battleship Center, the nonprofit group bringing the USS IOWA back to life, has been refurbishing the ship to prepare for its move to the Port of Los Angeles Berth 87. This process includes the re-stepping of the original mast, a time-honored ritual in the maritime world that is thought to have originated in ancient Rome.   One theory is that the Romans placed coins under the mast so the crew would have the funds needed to pay to cross the River Styx to the afterlife if the ship were sunk


This Day in Naval History - May 25

From Navy News Service 1952 - USS Iowa (BB 61) bombards Chongjin, Korea. 1973 - Launch of Skylab 2 mission, which was first U.S. manned orbiting space station. It had an all Navy crew of Capt. Charles Conrad Jr. (commanding), Cmdr. Joseph P. Kerwin, and Cmdr. Paul J. Weitz.


Cold Spell Halts Mississippi River Barge Traffic

Barge traffic on the upper and mid-Mississippi River was slowing this week as a cold snap in the U.S. Midwest created ice on the Mississippi at Guttenberg, Iowa, and northward, shipping officials said on Wednesday. "It's very likely the last tow to move through Lock and Dam Number 10 near Guttenberg will be Thursday because of a build-up of ice," said a U.S. Army Corps official. A tow consisting of six barges was moving south from Clayton, Iowa


Managerial Appointments at MOL (America)

MOL (America) Inc. announced the appointment of Mr. Thomas Smart to the position of Midwest Regional Import Sales Manager, and the promotion of Mr. Larry Flading to the position of Midwest Regional Export Sales Manager. Mr. Smart assumes his new position having served as MOL (America) Inc.’s Midwest Regional Export Sales Manager since joining MOL in September 2002. Mr. Smart, who brings two decades of industry knowledge and experience to his new position


Navy Names Five New Ships

Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced today the next five Navy ships; three Arleigh Burke class guided-missile destroyers, the USS John Finn, the USS Ralph Johnson, and the USS Rafael Peralta, and two littoral combat ships (LCS), the USS Sioux City and the USS Omaha. Mabus named the three destroyers after Navy and Marine Corps heroes whose actions occurred during different conflicts which spanned several decades, but were united in their uncommon valor


Battleship on Voyage to New Home

USS Iowa: Photo credit Naval Historical Foundation

Transferred to ownership of the Pacific Battleship Center, historic battleshilp USS Iowa sails for preservation in new homeport Following years of aging in the San Francisco Bay area’s ghost fleet, the 887-foot long ship that once carried President Franklin Roosevelt to a World War II summit to meet with Churchill, Stalin and Chiang Kai Shek is coming to life once again as it is being prepared for what is most likely its final voyage.


Navy Scores a Hit on Non-Functioning Satellite

As a single modified tactical Standard Missile-3 (SM-3) launches from the U.S. Navy AEGIS cruiser USS Lake Erie (CG 70), successfully impacting a non-functioning National Reconnaissance Office satellite approximately 247 kilometers (133 nautical miles) over the Pacific Ocean, as it traveled in space at more than 17,000 mph. President George W. Bush decided to bring down the satellite because of the likelihood that the satellite could release hydrazine fuel upon impact


New Navy Contracts

Austal USA, Mobile Ala., was awarded a $99,557,548 modification to previously awarded contract (N00024-08-C-2217) on Jun. 17, 2009, for long lead time material (LLTM) for Ships 2 and 3 of the Joint High Speed Vessel (JHSV) Program.  This contract provides LLTM for main propulsion engines, aluminum, waterjets, reduction gears, generators, and other components to support construction of JHSV Ships 2 and 3, commencing in June 2010


Food Aid Creates Revenue for Maritime & Other Industries

The United States' principal international food aid program, Food for Peace, helped create and sustain 866 jobs which resulted in $37m in earnings in the state of Louisiana in 2009. By delivering food aid to foreign countries, the maritime industry employs 11,500 in deep sea freight transportation and sustains more than 97,000 jobs in other parts of the U.S. economy, in occupations dealing with the handling, processing and transporting of commodities from farmers to U.S


U.S. Army Corps to Close Upper Mississippi As Waters Rise

Storm system

  Rising flood waters were expected to make 11 locks and dams impassable on the mid- and upper-Mississippi River and force the closure of the river later on Monday from Bellevue, Iowa, to Saverton, Missouri, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers said. The closure would be the most extensive since 2008 on that stretch of the country's busiest waterway, said Ron Fournier, public affairs officer for the Army Corps' Rock Island district


Today in U.S. Naval History: September 24

USS Enterprise (CVAN-65) is launched September 24, 1960 at Newport News Shipbuilding. (Photo courtesy of Huntington Ingalls Industries)

Today in U.S. Naval History - September 24 1918 - Ensign David S. Ingalls, USNR, in a Sopwith Camel, shoots down his fifth enemy aircraft, becoming the first U.S. Navy ace while flying with the British Royal Air Force. 1944 - 5th Fleet carrier aircraft attack Japanese in Visayas


Cape Ray to be Honored at USS AOTOS Event

U.S. Navy photo by Lacordrick Wilson

The MV Cape Ray, a Keystone-managed Ready Reserve Force containership that worked in the Mediterranean Sea for the U.S. Government neutralizing chemical material from Syria, will receive a special recognition on November 7 at the United Seamen's Service Admiral of the Ocean Sea (USS AOTOS) event


Today in U.S. Naval History: September 26

USS Ranger (CV-4). Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

Today in U.S. Naval History: September 26 1781 - French fleet defeats British at Yorktown, Va. 1910 - First recorded reference to provision for aviation in Navy Department organization 1918 - USCGC Tampa lost with 118 men, probably by German submarine


HII Appoints Brenton as Corporate Director

Kevin Brenton is HII’s corporate director of customer affairs for submarine programs. Photo by Chris Oxley/HII

Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII) announced today that Capt. Kevin Brenton (U.S. Navy, Ret.) has joined the company as corporate director of customer affairs for submarine programs. Brenton served most recently as deputy director of the Navy's Strategic Systems Programs


US Navy to Christen Submarine John Warner

Shipbuilders at Newport News Shipbuilding pull the bow flag tight on the Virginia-class attack submarine Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) John Warner (SSN 785) in preparation for the boats Sept. 6 christening. The bow flag is about 30 feet in diameter and will be the centerpiece of the christening ceremony. (U.S. Navy photo courtesy of Huntington Ingalls Industries by John Whalen)

The Navy will christen its newest Virginia-class attack submarine John Warner, Sept. 6, during a 6:30 p.m. EDT ceremony at Newport News Shipyard in Newport News, Virginia. Former U.S. Sen. John Warner will deliver the ceremony's principal address


Today in U.S. Naval History: September 5

Today in U.S. Naval History - September 5 1776 - Adoption of first uniforms for Navy officers 1813- USS Enterprise captures HM brig Boxer off Portland, Maine 1918 - USS Mount Vernon torpedoed by German submarine off France 1923 - U.S


New Virginia-class Submarine Christened 'John Warner'

John Warner christening: Photo USN/HII by John Whalen

Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) 'John Warner' (SSN 785), will be the first Virginia-class attack submarines to be homported in Naval Station Norfolk, following its christening by Mrs. Jeanne Warner at Newport News Shipbuilding yard, informs the US Navy.


DoD Awards Two Ship Repair Contracts

USS Mount Whitney: Photo USN

The US Department of Defense informs it has awarded a contract to Brodogradiliste Viktor Lenac D.D., Rijeka, Croatia, for the 'USS Mount Whitney', and a contract modification to General Dynamics National Steel and Shipbuilding Co., San Diego, California for work on 'USS Boxer'.


Today in U.S. Naval History: September 12

Today in U.S. Naval History: September 12 1916 - First demonstration of automatic stabilization and direction gear in aircraft 1944 - 5th Fleet carrier aircraft begin three-day attack on Japanese shipping and facilities in Visayas, Philippines


Two US Navy Jets Crash into The Pacific

An MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopter from the Red Lions of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 15 lands on the flight deck of the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) during search and rescue operations for the pilot of one of two F/A-18 Hornets which crashed earlier in the day while operating from the ship. The other pilot was located and returned to Carl Vinson for medical care. (U.S. Navy photo by John Philip Wagner, Jr.)

The pilot of one of two F/A-18 Hornets that crashed Sept. 12 while operating from USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) is in fair condition and receiving medical treatment aboard the ship. Search efforts continue for the missing pilot. At the time of the incident


BAE Systems Awarded 'USS Hopper' Repair Contract

USS Hopper: Photo USN

US Department of Defense informs BAE Systems Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii, is being awarded a not-to-exceed $22,905,907 undefinitized contract action to a previously awarded contract (N00024-14-C-4412) for repair and alteration of USS Hopper (DDG-90).


Today in U.S. Naval History: September 16

USS Grayback (USN photo courtesy of Robert Hurst)

Today in U.S. Naval History - September 16 1854 - Cdr. David G. Farragut takes possession of Mare Island, the first U.S. Navy Yard on the Pacific. 1917 - Navy Department authorizes establishment of 16 Naval air stations abroad 1922 - Cdr


Today in U.S. Naval History: September 17

Today in U.S. Naval History - September 17 1861 - Union landing party from USS Massachusetts takes possession of Ship Island, Mississippi. This was the headquarters for Adm. David Farragut's Gulf Coast Blockading Squadron. 1944 - Navy Task Force lands Army troops on Angaur


International Seapower Symposium Kicks Off in Newport, R.I.

ISS pre-meeting talk: Photo USN

The 21st edition of the International Seapower Symposium (ISS) began Sept. 16 at the U.S. Naval War College (NWC) in Newport, R.I., with more than 170 representatives from 113 nations attending.
 Throughout the three-day symposium, naval leaders from around the world will attend presentations and


Today in U.S. Naval History: September 23

USNS Mercy and USNS Comfort (U.S. Navy photo)

Today in U.S. Naval History - September 23 1779 - Capt. John Paul Jones in Continental Navy frigate Bonhomme Richard captures HMS Serapis. 1931 - Lt. Alfred Pride pilots Navy's first rotary wing aircraft, XOP-1 autogiro, in landings and takeoffs on board USS Langley while underway.






 
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