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Uss Cole

Following Wake of Terrorist Attacks, USS Cole is Relaunched

Shortly following terrorist attakcs in both New York and Washington, D.C., USS Cole, the destroyer, which was itself the victim of a terrorist attack, was relaunched back into the water on September 14 at Northrop Grumman Corporation. The ship was launched a day earlier than previously scheduled at the company's Ingalls Operations. The ship had been moved onto land in January into a construction bay near where Cole was originally built by Northrop Grumman. The USS Cole crippled in a terrorist attack in the Port of Aden, Yemen, on Oct. 12, 2000, returned to its construction shipyard on the deck of the Norwegian heavy lift ship Blue Marlin last December. Capt. Philip N. Johnson, USN, supervisor of Shipbuilding, Pascagoula, said that work to date aboard the USS Cole has consisted of more than 550 tons of steel structural repairs to replace the damaged area's exterior plating. He added that the relaunching of Cole represents completion of all structural repairs and restoration. Other completed work includes the replacement of damaged and unserviceable equipment, and removal, evaluation and recertification of critical systems such as shafting and propellers. The repair process is moving along as scheduled. Following the relaunch, work will be completed on component system assemblies, alignment of machinery, energizing, testing and alignment of all systems, and completion of logistics and supply support outfitting


U.S. Warships Avoiding Suez Canal After Cole Blast

U.S. military vessels have not been using the Suez Canal since the alleged suicide attack on the USS Cole on Oct. 12, but U.S. and Egyptian officials are working very closely on security arrangements for the vital waterway, a military spokesman said. A spokesman for the U.S. Central Command emphasized the importance of the Suez Canal, which connects the Mediterranean Sea and the Red Sea, to U.S. military and commercial traffic and said Egypt took the waterway's security very seriously


US Navy Takes Cole Commander off Promotion List

The officer who commanded the USS Cole when it was attacked in Yemen in 2000 will not be promoted because he did not meet the standards expected of commanding officers, the U.S. Navy said on Monday. Almost six years after the al Qaeda attack that killed 17 sailors while the American destroyer was refueling, Navy Secretary Donald Winter pulled Cmdr. Kirk Lippold off a promotion list, saying he was not qualified to rise to the rank of captain, the Navy said in a statement.


Canadian Navy Puts Out Tenders for Floating Barrier

The Canadian navy is moving ahead with plans to build a floating fence around its dockyards in Halifax, according to a CBC News report. Currently, there is no physical barrier stopping any boat from targeting the navy's 22 major warships in Halifax and Esquimalt on the West Coast. The navy hopes a two-meter-high barrier will prevent attacks like the one in Yemen in 2000, when a small boat loaded with explosives rammed into the American warship USS Cole


USS Sterett Commissioned in Special Ceremony

A crew member of the newly commissioned guided missile destroyer USS Sterett (DDG 104) stands at parade rest after being given the order to man the ship and bring her to life by the ship sponsor Michelle Sterett-Bernson. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Kevin S. OBrien/Released)

By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Patrick Grieco The U.S. Navy's commissioned the latest guided-missile destroyer USS Sterett (DDG 104) at 's Locust Point Cruise terminals Aug. 9 - the fourth time in naval history that a ship bears this name. The ship can now directly support the Navy's effort to execute the maritime strategy. During the ceremony, Greg Sterett, a descendant of the ship's namesake Lt. Andrew Sterett, was dressed in a colonial naval uniform


Training & Education: Blue Ridge Officers Complete Safety Training

The U.S. Navy's Seventh Fleet command ship, USS Blue Ridge (LCC-19), is outfitted with the latest command, control, and communications technology in order to effectively command naval units defending the national interests of the United States. This highly visible ship, which operates routinely in the Western Pacific and Indian Ocean, and waters adjacent to areas involved in the War on Terrorism, visits many foreign ports, conducting military and diplomatic engagements with U.S


Cruise Lines Turn to LRAD

BBC reported that the crew of the Seabourn Spirit quickly changed course and headed out into open water to evade the attackers in small boats who had raked the vessel with rockets and automatic weapons fire. They also deployed a military-grade sonic weapon. The long range acoustic device, or LRAD, is a high-tech loudhailer capable of causing permanent damage to hearing from a distance of more than 984 ft. Commissioned and designed after the al-Qaeda attack on the USS Cole in Yemen in


Vice Admiral Nanos Retires

Vice Adm. Pete Nanos, Commander of Naval Sea Systems Command and the Navy's senior engineering duty officer, retired June 26 in a ceremony at the Washington Navy Yard after 35 years of service. Nanos, a native of Bedford, N.H., has commanded NAVSEA since May 1998. Under his leadership, instituted far-reaching quality initiatives that transformed NAVSEA into a unified corporation that provides world-class technical, acquisition, and life-cycle support leadership to the Navy.


MSC Delivers Patrol Boat to Iraqi Navy

Military Sealift Command-chartered heavy lift crane ship MV Ocean Titan delivered the second of a new class of U.S.-built patrol boats to Manama, Bahrain. The 115-ft boat is destined for Iraq, where it will be turned over to the Iraqi navy and used primarily to patrol coastal waters and provide security for the country's oil platforms. This is the second of an expected 15 identical vessels being built for and delivered to the Iraqi navy in support of U.S


Ultrastrip Issued Patent

US' UltraStrip Systems, the developer of robotic ship hull cleaning equipment, has announced that it has received from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office patent number US 6,564,815 titled "Air Gap Magnetic Mobile Robot". The new patent allows UltraStrip Systems to further expand its patented coatings removal systems. The advantages to the Air Gap patent over existing UltraStrip patented roller designs are greater adhesion and non-marring of the surface.


Today in U.S. Naval History: April 15

USS Chester (Photo courtesy NavSource)

Today in U.S. Naval History: April 15 1885 - Naval forces land at Panama to protect American interests during revolution 1912 - USS Chester and USS Salem sailed from MA to assist RMS Titanic survivors 1918 - First Marine Aviation Force formed at Marine Flying Field, Miami, Fla.


Today in U.S. Naval History: February 28

USS Indiana (U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.)

Today in U.S. Naval History - February 28 1844 - Explosion of Peacemaker, experimental 14 inch gun, on board USS Princeton. 1893 - Launching of USS Indiana (BB-1), first true battleship in U.S. Navy. 1959 - USS Strong rescues 13 Arab fishermen from Bahrain when their fishing boats


Defense: USS Cole Bomber Should Not Face Death

Photograph by Sgt. Don L. Maes, USMC

By Medina Roshan, Reuters Defense lawyers for the Saudi man charged with masterminding the 2000 USS Cole bombing that killed 17 American sailors argued on Friday he should not face the death penalty because the murders were not premeditated.


Today in U.S. Naval History: February 7

Paricutin (AE-18) rearming Coral Sea (CVA-43). U.S. Navy photo.

Today in U.S. Naval Hostory - February 7 1800 - USS Essex becomes first U.S. Navy vessel to cross the Equator. 1815 - The Board of Naval Commissioners, a group of senior officers, is established to oversee the operation and maintenance of the Navy


Today in U.S. Naval History: January 17

USS Nautilus (SSN-571), photo courtesy Idaho National Laboratory

Today in U.S. Naval History - January 17 1832- USS Peacock makes contact with Vietnamese court officials 1900 - U.S. (Cdr. Taussig in USS Bennington) takes formal possession of Wake Island 1955 - USS Nautilus (SSN-571), the first nuclear-powered submarine


Marine Cybersecurity: Is Your Ship Safe? Are You Sure?

There is a growing threat to marine safety, security, and environmental protection from the over-reliance on electronics to accomplish operational tasks.

On February 12, 2013, President Obama issued Executive Order 13636 – Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity.  Citing repeated electronic intrusions into critical infrastructure, the document states that it is the policy of the United States Government to increase the volume


Today in U.S. Naval History: December 18

USS Wasp (CVS-18. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Today in U.S. Naval History - December 18 1902 - Admiral of the Navy George Dewey receives orders to send his battleship to Trinidad and then to Venezuela to make sure that Great Britain's and Germany's dispute with Venezuela was settled by peaceful arbitration not force.


Naval Architect Pens History of Northwest Fishing Vessels

Jim Cole

Elliott Bay Design Group's Jim Cole can now add book author to his long list of accomplishments in the field of naval architecture and marine design. The Naval architect and fishing vessel expert recently appeared at Seattle's Pacific Maritime Expo to autograph copies of his new book


Today in U.S. Naval History: December 4

USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67). (USN Photo DN-ST-89-01287 by Photographer’s Mate 2d Class William Lipski)

Today in U.S. Naval History - December 4 1918 - President Woodrow Wilson sails in USS George Washington for Paris Peace Conference. 1943 - Aircraft from USS Lexington (CV-16) and USS Independence (CVL-22) attack Kwajalein Atoll, sinking four Japanese ships and damaging five others


USS George Washington Replaced in Philippine Relief Effort

USS Germantown: Photo USN

Dock landing ships 'USS Ashland' (LSD-48) and 'USS Germantown' (LSD-42) have replaced aircraft carrier 'USS George Washington', in the concerted efforts to extend relief efforts to typhoon victims in the Visayas region of the Philippines.
 Ashland and Germantown have aboard a combined total of


Today in U.S. Naval history: November 18

USS Currituck (U.S. Navy Photo)

Today in U.S. Naval history - November 18 1890 - USS Maine, first American battleship, is launched. 1922 – Cdr. Kenneth Whiting in a PT seaplane, makes first catapult launching from aircraft carrier, USS Langley, at anchor in the York River.


Navy Racing to Help Victims of Philippine Typhoon

Image courtesy of Global Medic

The  aircraft carrier 'USS George Washington' and other U.S. Navy ships have been ordered to make best speed for the Republic of the Philippines, and at the same time Britain is deploying a warship & military transport aircraft to help people devastated by Typhoon Haiyan.


Today in U.S. Naval History: November 5

USS Wake Island (CVE-65). Courtesy Aryeh Wetherhorn, U.S. Navy photo.

Today in U.S. Naval History - November 5 1775 - Commodore Esek Hopkins appointed to Commander in Chief of the Continental Navy. 1915 - In AB-2 flying boat, L.Cdr. Henry C. Mustin makes first underway catapult launch from a ship, USS North Carolina, at Pensacola Bay, Fla.


USS Nimitz Transits Suez Northbound to Mediterranean

USS Nimitz: Photo courtesy of USN

The nuclear-powered aircraft carrier 'USS Nimitz' (CVN 68) and her escort, guided-missile cruiser 'USS Monterey' (CG 61), which had earlier been operating in the Red Sea transit the Suez Canal. USS Nimitz will operate in the Mediterranean Sea and train with international partners before returning


U.S. Defense Conducts Maritime Strike Ops

Pictured is a B-1B Lancer on a training mission. The US Air Force recently conducted a successful test of its ability to neutralize and eliminate the threat of small boats in acts of terror. During that testing period, a B-1B Lancer supersonic variable-sweep-wing bomber launched a GBU-10 laser-guided bomb to take out a remotely-controlled mobile surface vehicle.  The GBU-10 has a published accuracy of 3.6 feet, making it a good weapon against a small target like a boat. Although its 945 pound wa

The looming threat of small boats to national security calls into play some innovative options. Since the horrific terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 revealed a series of national security vulnerabilities, the U.S. Departments of Defense and Homeland Security have been exploring options to


 
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