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Worthington Pump And Machinery Corporation

A—VERTICAL SINGLE ACTION "TWINPLEX" BEAM AIR PUMP

B—VERTICAL SIMPLEX STYLE "A" PISTON PUMP

C—WORTHINGTON SPECIAL CIRCULATING VOLUTE PUMP — STEAM TURBINE DRIVEN

WORTHIXGTON PUMP AND MACHINERY CORPORATION was created April 20, 1916, pursuant to a plan of reorganization of the International Steam Pump Company, by which all of the related interests of the predecessor company were thoroughly unified. The history of these interests is the history of the manufacture of pumping machinery in the United States.

This is a branch of manufacture in which the United States has attained preeminence in the in-dustrial world, with a mastery so great that pumping machinery of American design and manufacture is in demand wherever civilization and industry have advanced beyond the primitive hand methods of pumping. The improvements in design and mechanical construction which have brought American pumping machinery its present prestige and leadership have chiefly come from the progressive research and experiment of the com-panies out of which the Worthington Pump and Machinery Corporation has been evolved. Amer-ican eminence is very great in all kinds of pumping machinery, and in none to greater degree than in those pumps that are made for ship use.

Pumps suitable for marine service, and particularly for battleships, cruisers, torpedo boat destroyers and submarines, have always received particular attention on the part of this corporation, and its product for such service has long been regarded as the standard of excellence, not only in the United States but with the great maritime powers of the world.

More than half a century ago the Blake- Knowles Vertical Twin Vacuum Pump had practically driven all other types from the ocean, and is today not only the standard of the United States Navy, but the type most exclusively used by the merchant marine throughout the world.

The development of the pumping equipment of sea-going vessels has kept pace with the marvelous progress that has been made in every branch of the construction and equipment of ships during more than half a century.

During the Civil War, with its demand for rapid naval expansion, the Blake-Knowles Works met the needs of the situation, promptly furnishing for 6ur ships the many types of pumping machinery required, and making notable records for volume and speed of production. In the period preceding the Great War, the Blake-Knowles Twinplex pump earned for itself a reputation in marine circles as a pump which excelled all others of a like type and for similar uses.

Now, when the need for the prompt equipping of vessels is more vital than at any time in our history, the Worthington Pump and Machinery Corporation is, on its part, better prepared to meet the naval requirements than ever before. Its Blake-Knowles Works at East Cambridge, Mass.. Has been entirely rebuilt and enlarged to twice its former size, and is now exclusively given over to the manufacture of pumping and allied machinery for marine service. With its extensive and highly modern facilities, and long experience in the marine field, the Blake-Knowles Works is undoubtedly the largest and best equipped plant in America today for the production of Vertical Simplex Boiler Feed Pumps; Vertical Twinplex Wet and Dry Vacuum Pumps; Horizontal Duplex Ballast, Fire and Bilge, Oil Supply and Oil Circulating Pumps; Horizontal Simplex Evaporator Feed and Combined Air and Circulating Pumps; Marine Air Compressors.

But the marine activities of the corporation are not confined to the manufacture of pumping ma-chinery at its Blake & Knowles Works. At its Worthington Works at Harrison, N. J., it is building Surface Condensers for ships as well as Centrifugal Circulating Pumps, directly driven both by electric motor and steam turbine engines. At its Snow-Holly Works Marine Steam Engines are being built in large numbers, and the corporation is also prepared to furnish internal combustion engines for marine service operating on crude oil.

The affairs of the corporation are under the guidance of the following C. Philip Coleman, president; J. E. Sague, Leon P. Fuestamn and F. H. Jones, vice-presidents; W. H. Baumes, treasurer; C. W. Barney, secretary.

The executive offices of the corporation are lo-cated at 115 Broadway, New York City. Its works are at Harrison, N. J Holyoke, Mass East Cambridge, Mass Buffalo, N. Y Cincinnati, Ohio; Cudahy, Wis., and Hazleton, Pa.

 
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